21 Months with My Mom by Amanda Wolfe

I copy and posted this article from: http://www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_journal_individual.asp?blog_id=3716010
purely for the purpose of preserving this crucial piece of my family history.

21 Months with My Mom

I knew almost nothing about ovarian cancer when my mother was diagnosed. Would I be able to take care of her when she needed me most?
By Amanda Wolfe

Hearing the News

It’s my 27th birthday, the first without my mom, and I’m about to read the card she left for me. Last Christmas she made a whole stack of cards for my younger sister, Audrey, and me: one for every birthday and holiday she knew she’d miss. She was so proud of us — me, a magazine editor in New York City, and Audrey, a museum-studies graduate student. I want to be strong and brave, spirited and optimistic as Mom was. Sometimes I think I’m doing okay. And then I glance at something with her handwriting on it (like this card), or I see an e-mail from someone named Janice, and I break down.

On May 6, 2008, my 54-year-old mom, Janice Alexander, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Just 21 months later she died. As a physical therapist she lived to help others, and she was good at it. When I’m in my hometown of Dover, Ohio, I can’t leave the house without running into at least one person who says, “Your mother fixed me,” “She was magic,” or “She knew what was wrong with me when the doctors couldn’t figure it out.” I wish she could have used some of that healing power on herself.

The News

It was a beautiful spring day when Audrey, who was then 20 and in college a few hours away from our hometown, called and told me the devastating news: Mom had stage IIIC ovarian cancer. I was floored. My mom was healthy, worked hard, and loved to hike and garden. Surely there’d been a mistake! But it turned out that she’d ignored her symptoms for months. She had been having chronic pain in her lower abdomen, which she figured was because of digestive troubles or a groin pull from gardening. Eventually a large, painful lump forced her to see her family doctor, who sent her to the emergency room, where ultrasounds, a CT scan, and a colonoscopy confirmed that the lump and other masses were tumors. She needed emergency surgery to confirm the worst. She’s young and strong, I thought at first. She’ll be okay. But all you have to do is Google her condition to know it’s not good.

The surgeon performed a radical hysterectomy (removal of the uterus, ovaries, Fallopian tubes, and related lymph nodes) and got as much of the cancer as possible. That included doing a colostomy, because the tumor had wrapped around part of Mom’s bowel. “So, what is a colostomy exactly?” I asked my sister when she told me over the phone. “Um, there’s literally a part of her bowel sticking out of her stomach,” she said. “And there’s a bag attached, for the business.” Oh. Well then. Mom’s not going to like that. Our initial confusion seems ironic now: In an emergency room 20 months later, a nurse would ask me to attach my mother’s colostomy bag for her, because I had gotten so good at it.

I got on a plane immediately and headed home to Ohio, where Mom lived alone. She and my dad had divorced when I was 11. They were on decent terms; he even lived just two blocks away on the same street. Dad was supportive of my sister and me, but this was not his territory. My aunt and her family, who lived in the area, were great — they stayed with my sister while Mom was in surgery and they picked me up from the airport. But I had to be there for Mom. I was older and it felt that I was somehow in charge.

When I got there I was struck by how very thin she was. There’s nothing that hits you in the gut like seeing your mother lying in a hospital bed: pale, thin, frail. In the months before the diagnosis she had lost a lot of weight. She thought it was just stress. In retrospect all of her symptoms added up: unexplained weight loss, a change in bowel movements, abdominal pain. She downplayed them, to us and to herself. To find out that those seemingly unrelated things added up to cancer? It was shocking beyond belief.

The Recovery

We cried, we hugged, we tried to absorb the news. At one point my mom asked one of her doctors if she was terminal. He was visibly uncomfortable with the question. “No,” he said. But — and we could all sense that qualifier coming — the prognosis wasn’t good. She was as close to the line as you could be without being classified as stage IV (there is no stage V).

I stayed with my mom for two weeks after the surgery. Before she could begin chemotherapy, she had to heal. We had to cope with the usual things you go through while recovering from major surgery (pain, risk of infection, fatigue), plus the fact that all of her bowel movements went into a bag, which needed to be drained or changed often. The process of figuring out what the heck we were doing was slow and messy. Mom cried a lot. More than the cancer, the damned colostomy was the enemy. It was reversible, the doctors said. She clung to that hope.

The First Round of Chemo

The doctors removed all of my mom’s visible tumors. But microscopic cancer cells almost always remain, which meant that she needed chemotherapy drugs to wipe them out. Here was the game plan: Starting in late May she’d get eight rounds of chemo, one every three weeks. So my sister and I would switch off. She’d work it out with her professors to skip class for her “shifts,” and I’d take vacation time and fly in from New York for mine.

Mom’s chemo was a communal event. There were lounge chairs in a large light-filled room, a radio (which was always playing country, to my mother’s chagrin), blankets, pillows, magazines, and treats. We got to know the other patients and their families. The routine was always the same: blood work, IV, wait. Depending on how the day went, it could take five to seven hours. I worked on my laptop while she read or slept.

Mom wasn’t afraid of losing her hair. In fact, earlier we had gone to a wig store, and while it wasn’t exactly a fabulous spa day, it was fun to try on different styles and snap photos. But then her hair actually started to fall out and she was almost bald, except for a few long hairs. It wasn’t a great look. “Mom, don’t you want to cut those hairs off?” we would gently ask. “Nope!” she’d cheerfully reply. “I figure whatever hair is stubborn enough to stick around, it should get to stay.” She had a nice wig and a growing collection of scarves and hats, but they were scratchy and hot. Unless she knew it would really make someone uncomfortable, she often went au naturel.

The Second Surgery

After the chemo, Mom gained some weight and looked much healthier. She was eager to get the colostomy reversed, so she was scheduled for surgery in early November 2008. Her general surgeon would reconnect the bowel, and while they were in there, her gynecologic oncologist would do a “second look” procedure to determine whether the cancer was still present. Unfortunately, it was bad news on both fronts: The surgeon couldn’t reconnect the bowel completely and, worse, they found more cancer in her abdominal cavity. And that would mean more chemo. I knew from all the research I’d done that ovarian cancer almost always recurs, even after chemo. But you can’t prepare for seeing your mom crumble under the weight of a double whammy like this.

This time the healing process was harder, too, since her body had been through so much already. She was weak, upset, in pain. Her incision site got infected, and that was not pretty. In fact, the fix seemed downright barbaric: They opened it back up, then stuffed sterile gauze in it, which had to be changed at least once a day. And guess who got the honors? I once fainted after a pin-prick blood draw, and they were asking me to do what? It’s amazing what you’re capable of when you have no choice. So I was back on 24/7 nurse duty. After one 3 a.m. wake-up call, Mom looked at me fussing over her, smiled, and said, “You’re going to be a great mom.” I think she knew, even then, that she wouldn’t be around to meet her grandkids. It seemed like her way of saying, “You’ll be okay.”

Letting Go

Chemo, Round Two

She started chemo again just before Christmas 2008. This time her doctor tried a different mix of drugs, which caused different side effects. She became extremely sensitive to heat and pressure, so she couldn’t reach into the oven to grab a tray of Christmas cookies, couldn’t drink hot tea, take hot showers, or wear normal-size socks or pants because they cut off her circulation. There were also times when we had to delay her treatment until her blood counts were up enough so that she could tolerate the chemo. The problem with the irregular schedule was that I couldn’t fly in as easily as I’d done before. I hated that. We spent hours on the phone each day, but it killed me to have to call from hundreds of miles away instead of being able to pop by and take care of things for her. But to be honest, I was also relieved to get a little distance from what was happening, to feel like a normal 25-year-old just for a while. Then I’d feel terribly guilty for being relieved. It’s a struggle all caregivers go through; I know that now.

A Little Breathing Room

Mom was done with chemo, again, in April 2009. Her levels of CA-125 (a blood marker for ovarian cancer) were stable and in the normal range, and her CT scans were clear. At this point we knew better than to think the cancer would never come back, but we were hoping for a longer break, some normalcy. And we got it. Mom went back to work four or five days a week. She was able to get out more, go to family events and dinner with friends. She wanted to lose a few pounds — an unthinkable situation after her size-zero days just the year before. My fiance, Colin, and I took a trip to Ohio in late April, and we hiked to a waterfall my family had often visited when I was a kid. The sun was shining and flowers were peeking out of the brush. Mom was vibrant and happy, bopping down the path with her head of shaggy new hair. I snapped a few photos, thinking, This is my mom. This is exactly how I want to remember her.

Another Recurrence

By late summer we started to see Mom’s CA-125 levels creep upward again. She had a CT scan, and it showed fluid collecting around her liver. Her oncologist was fairly certain that meant the cancer was back. Damn. By then we had given up talking about a “cure.” She was resigned to going through chemo again and again to keep the tumors at bay, but my sister and I worried about how much more Mom’s body could take. She was still feeling well, and we had a little time to make our treatment decisions, so for a second opinion we took her to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City, one of the world’s best facilities. We were hoping for a miracle, I suppose — some treatment our (actually quite advanced) cancer center in Ohio wasn’t doing. But the prognosis was the same: The fluid meant that the cancer was probably on her liver. The trip was worth it, though, if only for the happy memories of our few days in New York. We saw a Broadway show, explored downtown Manhattan, and had lunch on the water with a view of the Statue of Liberty. For a little while we could relax in the late-summer sunshine and pretend that the cancer wasn’t coming back.

By fall 2009 the fluid wasn’t just around her liver but was building up in her entire abdominal cavity, creating enormous pressure on her stomach and organs. The pain became unbearable, so they decided to drain her. That’s exactly what it sounds like — a CT scan to pinpoint the fluid pockets and then a big needle into the belly with a tube to draw out the fluid. Luckily it wasn’t that painful. In fact, it was such instant relief that she cried tears of happiness and promptly took herself out to dinner.

But the fluid kept coming back, despite the new chemo. She started having to be drained every week. Then the fluid was red with blood. That was bad for a lot of reasons, most obviously because she was losing a lot of blood. Twice she went to the hospital directly after the draining for a blood and platelet transfusion. She was weak, scared, and confused. “I never thought it would be like this,” she said quietly in the car with me one day. “I just want to die.”

After her second hospital stay in as many weeks (because she was so weak and dehydrated), I e-mailed her oncologist. It was the e-mail I had been dreading for months but knew I’d eventually have to write. There’s no good way to ask a doctor if your mother is dying, but I explained that if he thought she had taken a turn for the worse, I was going to come home to be with her. I could take a leave of absence from work. I was utterly terrified that she would die alone. “Is it time to come home?” I implored. When he e-mailed back that yes, he thought I should come home, I didn’t cry. I didn’t freak out. I just had a numb, sinking feeling — like holding my breath for weeks. Crying would have felt better.

The Final Stretch

How could I tell my mom I was coming home because she was dying? I couldn’t, so I told her I was coming to take care of her until she got well, and there was no stopping me. But I knew it was the last time. I packed two suitcases, made plans to work from home, kissed my fiance good-bye, and flew to Ohio, not knowing how long I’d be there. Those six weeks ended up being the longest — and shortest — of my life.

Mom was remarkably cheerful and healthy looking when I arrived just after New Year’s to spring her from the hospital. Because her fluid had just been drained, she was ravenously hungry and started making excited plans for all the meals we could have. She was craving chicken Marsala and fried oysters. When we got home she immediately asked for her recipe box. Surrounded by a pile of recipes, she picked out her favorites. I sat next to the bed diligently making a massive shopping list. If she wanted all that food, by God she would have it. I spent the next day cooking. I even managed to track down oysters in Ohio in January — exorbitantly expensive, but who cares?

I began to hope. “She’s obviously feeling better,” I told Colin over the phone. “Maybe she can turn the corner and things could be okay.” But then she started filling up with fluid again. It was excruciating for me to see her in pain, not knowing if she would make it to tomorrow. I called my sister, who was now in graduate school in upstate New York, and although Mom fought against “disrupting her studies,” Audrey came home, too.

When Mom’s legs started to swell up until they were almost twice their normal size, I knew her lymph system was shutting down. It was time to surround ourselves with people who could just make her as comfortable as possible. But it’s an incredibly hard decision to stop traditional medical treatment and switch to hospice care. It feels like giving up. Mom knew what was going on, but she was simply not ready to admit that she was dying. She even stubbornly claimed, right up until her very last days, that she’d be around for a long time. That was how she needed to face the situation, so we played along. But something had to give.

After yet another stay in the hospital, a home health nurse took one look at my mom, wrapped her arms around her and said, “Janice, it’s time to call hospice.” Mom broke down. “I thought I was ready to die,” she said. “But I’m not.” We hugged her, sobbing together. By that afternoon, the hospice caseworker and nurses were at our house. Then a local medical-supply company dropped off a bedside commode, an oxygen machine, and a shower chair. Our hospice social worker stopped by to chat. The day after that the chaplain came, then the nurse again. The hospice workers were wonderful; it takes a very special type of person to do that for a living. Even better was the sense of empowerment it gave us. Making the hospice decision helped us feel that, yes, this is terrifying and devastating, but we can do it. We called my mom’s oncologist to tell him that we were going to stop treatment. “I believe in my heart that you are making the right decision,” he said. It was a powerful moment. We knew we were doing the right thing, but it was reassuring to hear that echoed by her doctor.

The next few days were a frenzy of activity followed by a lot of sleepless nights. I had never felt this kind of physical and emotional exhaustion. I was running on empty, barely showering or eating, deeply sad and dreading that the worst was yet to come. At some point a hospice nurse looked me straight in the eye. “It’s an amazing gift you’re giving your mother,” she said. “You know that, right?” Her comment put it all starkly into perspective. “She deserves it,” I said.

There were some lovely moments. The whole family — my aunt and uncle, my cousins, some of their kids — all piled into the bedroom one night to tell funny and outrageous stories. One afternoon we sorted through Mom’s jewelry with her and spread it out on the bed. Together we decided who would get each piece, and she tucked them into envelopes, writing our names and then a little note about where the piece came from or why it was special.

She was remarkably lucid, but she did start to have strange visions in those last few days. She thought the cats were on the ceiling. She was also in an incredible amount of pain. The fluid buildup hadn’t stopped, but there was little more we could do except give her painkillers, including morphine, every few hours. I was extremely concerned about the fluid and blood buildup, now that we weren’t doing blood transfusions. When I spoke to the hospice nurse privately about my concerns that my mother was literally bleeding to death, she said to me with that look in her eyes, “It’s a very quiet way to go.”

Oh. God. That’s what we’re doing here, isn’t it? Jesus. Deep breath. I guess I hadn’t considered exactly how she would die. It was the cancer, of course. But the tumor itself doesn’t really kill the patient; eventually its effects do. All we could do was keep her as comfortable as possible.

The night before my mom died I slept in bed with her while my sister hauled in blankets and pillows to sleep on the floor as if for some bizarre slumber party. In the middle of the night Mom was crying out in pain, so we sat her upright to give her the painkillers. She wasn’t able to talk much by then, but I will always remember that she looked right at my sister and me just a few hours before she died and said, “I love you.”

Early the following morning, my sister and I sat on either side of the bed with her, holding her hand and stroking her head. It was time. She was moaning and not responsive at all anymore. Still, we poured out everything we had wanted to say in the last few days but couldn’t. We told her how very much we loved her. That we’d be okay. That we were so thankful for everything she’d done for us and given us. What a wonderful mother she was. I know that she heard us. Then, at just after 7 a.m. on February 7, 2010, she died. It’s a surreal and terrible thing to watch someone die. It’s unbelievable. Audrey and I just sat in the room with her, hugged each other and cried.

Celebrating Her Life

Mom had been very specific in her requests: She wanted a party. No funeral. No crying. Play ’70s music, eat, and be happy for the life she’d lived. She didn’t want us to remember the frail, swollen, dying woman. She wanted us to remember the good times. We played a slide show to celebrate the woman who built her own physical therapy practice and ran it for nearly 30 years. Who made so many sacrifices to raise my sister and me. Who climbed mountains in Peru and studied with the Incas. Who made her home totally, colorfully unique and was passionate about gardening. Who stubbornly worked all through her chemotherapy treatments until just a month before she died. Who left me a beautiful birthday card. Who gave my sister and me the strength to get through the most profoundly sad and difficult experience of our lives. The woman I miss — every single day — my mom.

Glimmers of Hope

Ovarian cancer is relatively rare: About 21,880 new cases were diagnosed this year, according to the National Cancer Institute, and about 13,850 deaths were reported. “It’s the most lethal gynecological cancer because more than 70 percent of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage,” says Johnathan M. Lancaster, MD, director of the Department of Women’s Oncology at the Moffitt Cancer Center, in Tampa. The cancer is rarely caught early because women often mistake the symptoms for something else or ignore them. If the cancer has metastasized (usually spreading to the abdomen, lymph nodes, or other parts of the body, as Janice Alexander’s had), five-year survival is less than 30 percent.

Early Detection

There’s no mammogram or Pap-test equivalent for ovarian cancer, but now there’s reason for hope: New research from the MD Anderson Cancer Center as well as a large trial in the United Kingdom show that watching your levels of CA-125 (a biomarker in ovarian-cancer patients used to check for therapy response and recurrence) over time shows promise as a screening tool. Based on your age and blood test score, your doctor would place you in either a low-, intermediate-, or high-risk group. The low-risk group would come back in a year for a follow-up blood test; the intermediate group would repeat the blood test in three months; and the high-risk group would be referred to a specialist for a transvaginal ultrasound test. “This may allow for an earlier diagnosis of ovarian cancer, while it’s still possibly curable,” says Barbara A. Goff, MD, director of gynecologic oncology at the University of Washington.

Until this approach is tested further and put into practice, which could take years, awareness is best, says Dr. Goff. The old thinking is that the disease has no symptoms. “Ovarian cancer had been called the silent killer,” she says. “But that’s been completely debunked by work that I and others have done.”

Be Aware of Symptoms

Patients whose early-stage ovarian cancer is diagnosed (which probably happens by accident while they’re having some other surgery or procedure) often report that they actually did have some early symptoms, says Dr. Lancaster. The medical community may be dismissive of common symptoms, so it’s vital that women advocate for themselves. Dr. Goff advises that if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if you’re over age 50, you should see your doctor for a pelvic exam, a CA-125 blood test, and a transvaginal ultrasound:

Persistent bloating, or having your stomach swell up, similar to how you feel right before your period (“This is not normal after menopause,” Dr. Goff says).
Difficulty eating, or feeling full quickly after a regular-size meal, which can lead to unexplained weight loss.
Pelvic pain or abdominal pain.
Change in bowel function, such as constipation or diarrhea.
Change in urinary symptoms, such as frequency or urgency.
“The symptom should be new to you, something you’ve had for less than a year,” Dr. Goff explains. “For most ovarian-cancer patients it’s something they’ve had for a few months. And it’s a symptom that occurs frequently, daily or every other day. If you’ve had it for 20 years it’s probably not ovarian cancer.”

What You Can Do to Prevent Ovarian Cancer

Taking birth control pills, especially for five to 10 years, can lower the chance of developing ovarian cancer by up to 50 percent, says Dr. Lancaster. “Anything that reduces the number of times you ovulate decreases your risk.” That also includes pregnancy and breastfeeding.
Tubal ligation and hysterectomy can also lower your risk. While these procedures aren’t done for that purpose alone, it is a fringe benefit.
If you’re at high risk because of a family history or because you have a mutation of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, having your ovaries and Fallopian tubes removed prophylactically reduces your chance of getting ovarian cancer by more than 90 percent.
Help and Support

The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (ovariancancer.org) has a downloadable symptom diary under “Resources.” The organization has helped teach students in 81 medical schools so far about the early symptoms of ovarian cancer through a program called Survivors Teaching Students: Saving Women’s Lives.
Find medical information, news about ovarian cancer and how you can help make a difference at the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (ovarian.org).
What Happens Now?

Follow along as Amanda Wolfe, a senior editor at LHJ, continues her emotional journey through the aftereffects of her mom’s death, and share your own experiences with ovarian cancer, too, at lhj.com/amanda

Originally published in Ladies’ Home Journal, November 2010.

Thomas Ferrell and Margaret Mahon

3rd great grandparents < James M Ferrell < Thomas W. Ferrell < Arthur Ferrell

Thomas Ferrell and Margaret Mahon were 1st cousins. Thomas was the son of Charles Ferrell and Mary Hitchcock. Margaret was the daughter of James Mahon and Amelia Hitchcock, the sister of Mary.

Thomas was born about 1814 in Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio. He died November 2, 1862 in St. Louis, Missouri, US., during the Civil War. He served in the 51st Ohio Infantry, Company E 03 Oct 1861. Mustered out on 03 Nov 1861 at Ohio River. One of the Civil War records estimates his birth year as 1819.

There is a marriage record for a Thomas Terrel and Margaret Mahon in Richland, Ohio on March 24, 1836.

In 1850, the family was living in Jackson, Ashland, Ohio and Thomas was a farmer. In 1860, Thomas was working as a laborer. On the census record for that year, the surname was spelled Farrell. They lived in Tuscarawas County at that time. Value of personal estate was 85.

margaretmahonferrell2

Margaret Mahon

Margaret Naomi Mahon was born November 12, 1818 in Jefferson Township, Richland, Ohio. She died on June 6, 1904. Margaret’s name on her son David’s death certificate is McMahon. Margaret has a very unusual tombstone, which makes one wonder about the story behind it.

margaretmahonferrell

The 1870 census record shows Margaret as head of house, with James, David and Wilson living with her. John Shea of Ireland also lived with them at this time. Included on the record as part of the family, but not of the same dwelling are Eliza Mitchner, Malinda Johnson, Lewis Carpenter, and Lewis A Johnson. By 1880 she was living with her son James and his family.

Thomas and Margaret had 18 children. These are the ones I’ve found:

  1. Mary Jane Ferrell born 1837. Married Isaac Bell. Their children:
    • Emma Jane Bell (1864-1944), married Dwight A Leffingwell (1863 – 1930). One daughter, Ruth B. Leffingwell.

    • Howard D Bell (1865-1961). Spanish American War Veteran, Co. M, 9th. Ohio Vol. Infantry. He married Ida Jeanette Page (1879-1903) in 1902 then Amanda Howell (1884) in 1913. He and Amanda had one son, Issac S. Bell (1918-1951) and he married Vera L. Miller. Issac was an engineman on the PA railroad. He served in WWII, 1st Lieutenant US Army, 355 Engineer general service regiment, infantry.  He died from injuries resulting from a fist fight.

    • Margaret Bell (1867)

  2. Charles D Ferrell born January 19, 1838, died April 7, 1914. Charles was a blacksmith and Civil War Veteran, Company K, 69th OVI. He married Phebe Adeline Taylor (1852-1900). Two daughters, at least one son:
    • Olive Ferrell (1878 -1968), married Frederick B. Singerman (1876 – 1920,) the son of Swiss immigrants. At least two sons: Charles P. Singerman (1905 – 1912) and John Singerman (1897.) Note: on the birth record for Charles, Olive’s maiden name is listed as Terrill.
    • Mary J Ferrell (May 11, 1876)
    • TJP Ferrell (1886) married Fanny Zumwalt. Their children: Prudence E (1911), Mary O. (1913), Sarah A. (1915), Charles I.A. (1916), Frederick (1920)
  3.  Isaac Ferrell born 1840
  4. Elizabeth M. Ferrell born 1841
  5. John Knox Polk Ferrell born August 16, 1844, died February 4, 1929. He was a blacksmith. He married Lida L. He served in the Civil War, Company A, 51st OVI. His death record names him as James K P Ferrell, and the 1850 US Census names him as JTH Ferrell. At least one daughter, Octave Ferrell (born about 1877) married Charles W Forster. They had at least two daughters, Helen F (1907) and Margaret Forster (1909.) Helen married Harold E. Nice (1905) and they had at least one son, Robert Forster Nice (1936-2004.)
  6. William Ferrell born about 1847. William is listed on the 1850 US Census, but not the 1860 US Census. He and John were both born in Ashland, Ohio. I did find records for a William Ferrell about the same age, born in Ashland but I cannot be positive it’s the same individual. There is a US Census in 1860 listing a 14 year old William Ferrell living with Cyrus and Mary Hendren in Delaware, Ohio. Cyrus was a farmer, so perhaps William was working on his farm at this time. One can only guess.
  7. James M. Ferrell
  8. David M. Ferrell born 1852. David had a son named James K Polk Ferrell. I presume this explains the mistake on John K Polk Ferrell’s death record. He married Sarah Elizabeth Hutchinson Whitman (1850, Ireland). He worked as a restaurant clerk. Their children:
    • Emma C Ferrell (1876-1944) married George William Hibbs (1866-1949). Their children:
      • Edwin H Hibbs (1893) married Anna Beamer (1893). One son, Harold
      • Winfield Hibbs (1917-1919) died from the Spanish flu/pneumonia. At least one daughter, Thelma (married Waldon T Leggett,) and one more son, William A.
      • William Clyde Hibbs (1894 – 1935) married Gretchen. By his WWI draft record, he was a coal miner, tall and stout with brown eyes and dark hair. He listed weak lungs as an exemption from the draft yet is listed as serving in the Army in 1917.
      • Florence Helen Hibbs (1895) married Andrew Brown (1885)
    • Henry Clarice Ferrell born November 3, 1878, died October 21, 1927. He married Minnie Deans of Scotland (1881). Their children:
      • Sarah Belle Ferrell born 2 February  1902, died 7 January 1987. She married William Duffet Postel (1896-1982). Their children:
        • Margaret J. Postel born 1918
        • William D. Postel Jr. born 1920. He married Mildred Helen Porter.
        • Damon H Postel born 1922, died 1999. US Army, Private, WWII.
        • Alice S. Postel born 1926
        • James Jacob Postel January 3, 1926 – April 29, 1937. He died from the flu.
    • Ruth May Ferrell born 30 July 1903
    • Viola Ferrell born 2 October 1904.
    • Isabel Ferrell born 30 January 1906, died 7 Nov 1988. Married Ging De Falo. Married ? Depald.
    • Goldie Ferrell born 27 June 1908, died 6 April 1964. Married Sherlock “Shirley” Morgan of Wisconsin (1904-1962.) One son, Henry Morgan (1927-1927) died due to being born 2 months premature. Other children:
      • Ronald Morgan (1926-1997) married Leah M McEuen. He served in WWII US Army, and at that time he worked as a painter.
      • Helene Mae Morgan (1930-1984) married Arthur E Bashor.
      • Kenneth P Morgan (1937.)
    • Anna Ferrell (1910 – 1980) married Gerald V Heft. They had at least one son, Henry. Secondly she married ? Beagle. She was living in California when she died.
    • Henry Ferrell born 1915 married Frances King.
    • Carrie Ferrell born 1881 and her twin,
    • Harry Ferrell born 1881.
    • William Franklin Ferrell born 1884. He married Mardella Collins (1889.)
    • James K Polk Ferrell  (1887-1967) married Ida E White (1891.) They had three sons, Francis, Clarence and William C Ferrell
  9. Wilson F. Ferrell born 1859

 

 

Sources

“Ohio Marriages, 1800-1958,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XDVH-XPG : 8 December 2014), Thomas Terrel and Margaret Mahon, 24 Mar 1836; citing Richland,Ohio, reference ; FHL microfilm 0388736 V. 3-6.

“United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MX36-YPB : 9 November 2014), Thomas Ferrell, Jackson, Ashland, Ohio, United States; citing family 24, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

“United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCPM-WRD : 30 December 2015), Thomas Farrell, 1860.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8G9-YL9 : 8 December 2014), Thomas Ferrell in entry for James M Ferrell, 05 Apr 1928; citing Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, reference fn 26914; FHL microfilm 1,991,297.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6ZD-J5Z : 8 December 2014), Thomas Ferrell in entry for James K P Ferrell, 04 Feb 1929; citing Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, reference fn 17687; FHL microfilm 1,991,764.

“Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F6JW-3B5 : 13 December 2014), Thomas Ferrell in entry for Charles Ferrell, 07 Apr 1914; citing Death, Perry Township, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, source ID v 1 p 166, County courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,361.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8FS-2MT : 8 December 2014), Thomas Ferrell in entry for Charles Ferrell, 07 Apr 1914; citing Perry Twp., Tuscarawas Co., Ohio, reference fn 25388; FHL microfilm 1,953,914.

Thomas

U.S., Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865. Historical Data Systems, comp.Ancestry.com Operations Inc. 2009. Provo, UT, USA.

“United States Civil War and Later Pension Index, 1861-1917”, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NH6Q-MQ3 : 24 March 2016), Thomas Ferrell, 1862.

Margaret

“United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6LB-4K1 : 17 October 2014), Margeret Ferrell, Ohio, United States; citing p. 19, family 144, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,772.

“United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M83S-X3G : 15 July 2016), Margaret Ferrell in household of James Ferrell, Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district ED 223, sheet 198C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1072; FHL microfilm 1,255,072.

“United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MMX6-1KP : 22 January 2015), Margaret Ferrell in household of James M Ferrell, Mill Township (excl. Dennison & Uhrichville), Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 8B, family 169, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,327.

Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=150920635&ref=acom

James M Ferrell and Sarah Adaline Minor

My second great grandparents: Thomas Ferrell, Arthur Ferrell

jamesferrellfamily

James M Ferrell was born March 31, 1848 in Harrison, Ohio, US. He was the son of Thomas Ferrell and Margaret Mahon. He died April 5, 1928 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. and buried April 7, 1928 in Union Cemetery, Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. His nickname was Catfish Jim, and he was a fisher and trapper. James was able to read and write. On May 7, 1874 he married Sarah Adaline Minor in Tuscarawas, Ohio, US.

As of 1850, his childhood home seemed to be in Jackson, Ashland, Ohio, US. His mother was born in Richland County, which doesn’t seem too far off to think they would have lived in Ashland. I can only guess how his parents met, being from different counties. How they ended up in Tuscarawas County is unclear as well. His father died about 1861, killed in the Civil War. The family was living in Uhrichsville as of 1860, at which time the spelling of the surname was Farrell.

As of 1870, he, his mother, two brothers were living in Uhrichsville. John Shea of Ireland, Eliza Mitchener, Melinda Johnson, Lewis Carpenter and Lewis A Johnson were living with them at this time, whomever those individuals might be. Perhaps they took in boarders at that time to help pay the bills, one can only guess. I have to wonder if these Johnsons might be related to Viola’s family at all. That’s also unclear at this time. His mother was living with his family as of the 1880 and 1900 US Census records.

At the age of death, he was retired. Cause of death is senility – anemia and jaundice – probably malignancy of liver (aka liver cancer.)

His obituary, from FindAGrave reads:

James M. Ferrell, 80, prominent retired Dutchtown resident, died Thursday morning at 8:12 at his home following an illness of 3 months. Death resulted from a complication of diseases. The deceased was born March 31, 1848 in Harrison County, a son of Thomas and Margaret Ferrell.

Surviving relatives include his widow, Sarah A. Ferrell; 4 children, Mrs. George Harshey, Thomas W. Ferrell, Dutchtown, Mrs. C. E. Groves, Big Bend, Miss Lulu Ferrell, at home; 1 brother, John K. P. Ferrell of Uhrichsville; fifteen grandchildren, and 12 great grandchildren. His brother is now the last of a family of 18 children.

The deceased had been a resident of Tuscarawas County most of his life and during his younger days was engaged as a driver on the old Ohio canal for a period of 6 years. At one time he served as Uhrichsville constable for 10 years and prior to his late illness had been actively associated with the Twin City Fish Market, this city, for 13 years. April 11, 1928 Chronicle.

Sarah Adaline Minor, sometimes spelled Miner, was born March 3, 1846 in New Rumley, Harrison, Ohio, US. She was the daughter of John William Minor and Catherine Gillaspie. Died August 18, 1928 in Mill Township, Tuscarawas, OH, US and was buried on August 20, 1928. I appears her name was spelled as Minor beginning after 1875, all previous records spelled it Miner. Sarah was a homemaker. She was able to read and write.

Sarah was born in the birthplace of General George Armstrong Custer, and there is some evidence her family and the Custers were intermingled for some time. General Custer’s father performed the marriage ceremony for her parents. From the research I’ve done, the Miner and Custer families were close friends for many years. One of Sarah’s cousins had a son with General Custer’s brother, Thomas Custer, who died at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

It’s been difficult to find any information on Sarah unfortunately. In 1850 the family was living in New Rumley. In 1870 it appears Sarah may have been living with a relative, William, and his wife Rachel. It appears her father may have died sometime between 1850 and 1860 so this makes sense. At this time, she was listed as being a domestic servant.

They had four children:

jamesferrellfamily2

(above: Clyde Harshey, Lula Ferrell, Clarance E Grove holding Lula Grove, Sarah Margaret Ferrell Grove, James M Ferrell, Sarah Adaline Minor Ferrell, Mary Ann Ferrell Harshey, George Harshey, Clinton Harshey, Viola May Fisher Ferrell, Thomas Wilson Ferrell. in front: Flora Grove Fowler, Thomas Harshey, Hazel Grove and Elsie Pauline Harshey Courtright. This picture must be from about 1906, 1907.)

  1. Mary Ann Ferrell (Ferrel on the birth index) born June 23, 1875 at Mill Twp., Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; died November 29, 1946. She married George Harshey (1868 -1956) on September 27, 1891. (note: her death record give her birth date as June 14, 1873. The date here is from her birth record. Also, the birth index for Mary Ann is of interest because it contains many family surnames: Fisher, Ferrell and namely, Sarah Trump.)Their children were:
    1. Clinton Ray Harshey (February 23, 1896 – October 17, 1918; he died from the flu pandemic)
    2. Clyde L Harshey (March 5, 1898 – February 1974)
    3. Elsie Pauline Harshey (June 10, 1903 – ?) married Joseph Lester Courtright (d. January 1980). Their children: Robert Courtright (May 27, 1923 – March 28, 2011), James Dean Courtright (1924 – October 28, 1941) and George and John Courtright who may or may not be living.
    4. Thomas Harshey (August 5, 1904 – February 1970)
    5. Sarah C Harshey (1908)
    6. Wilma Harshey (February 18, 1917 – July 30, 2000) Married William Horace Cole (1906 -1979), which was her second marriage.
  2. Sarah Margaret Ferrell born 1877, died 1939. She married Clarence Edward Groves (November 1877 – ?).
    From FindAGrave.com:
    “Sarah M. Grove was the wife of Clarence E. Grove. He owned a Photography studio in Uhrichsville Ohio. They had 2 daughters. Hazel and Flora Belle Grove Fowler. Flora Belle is buried in the East Avenue Cemetery in New Philadelphia, Ohio near the airport.”
    Their children:

    1. Flora Groves born 1901 married ? Fowler, had at least one daughter, Thelma E Fowler.
    2. Hazel Groves born 1904
    3. Lula Marie Grove born April 24, 1906, died October 31, 1909
  3. Thomas Wilson Ferrell
  4. Lulu Ferrell born September 1883, died August 2, 1940. She became a nurse, and my mother recalls she once helped save her brother Thomas’s life.

 

lulaferrell

Sources:

“Ohio Marriages, 1800-1958,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XDWQ-N9D : 8 December 2014), James Ferrell and Sarah A. Miner, 07 May 1874; citing Tuscarawas, Ohio, reference V7, P135, cn14057; FHL microfilm 890,365.

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XD5Z-NH3 : 8 December 2014), James Ferrell and Sarah A. Miner, 07 May 1874; citing Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, reference V7, P135, cn14057; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,365.

“Ohio Marriages, 1800-1958,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XDVT-3LQ : 8 December 2014), James Ferrell and Sarah A. Miner, 07 May 1874; citing Tuscarawas,Ohio, reference ; FHL microfilm 0890365 V. 6-7.

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6D3-Z44 : 24 May 2016), James Ferrell in entry for Mary Ann Ferrell, 23 Jun 1875; citing Birth, Mill Twp., Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,357.

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6H8-3LS : 24 May 2016), James Ferrell in entry for Mary Ann Ferrel, 23 Jun 1875; citing Birth, Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,358.

“Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XXQG-B1Q : 8 December 2014), James Ferrell in entry for Mary Ann Ferrel, 23 Jun 1875; citing Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, reference ; FHL microfilm 890,358.

“United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M83S-X3V : 24 December 2015), James Ferrell, Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district ED 223, sheet 198C, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1072; FHL microfilm 1,255,072.

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6D3-YFC : 24 May 2016), James Ferrell in entry for Thomas Wilson Ferrell, 16 Dec 1881; citing Birth, Warwick Twp., Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,357.

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6HN-4V8 : 24 May 2016), Sarah Miner in entry for Thomas Wilson Fernel, 18 Dec 1881; citing Birth, Warwick, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,358.

“United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMX6-1KK : 22 January 2015), James M Ferrell, Mill Township (excl. Dennison & Uhrichville), Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 8B, family 169, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,327.

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8JS-NCS : 8 December 2014), James M. Ferrell in entry for Thomas W. Ferrell and Viola May Fisher, 28 Jul 1909; citing Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, reference cn 28405; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,369.

“United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MDR2-YSJ : 14 December 2015), James M Ferrell, Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 8B, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,444.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XXSS-P8H : 8 December 2014), James M. Ferrell in entry for Mary Annie Harshey, 29 Nov 1946; citing , reference certificate; FHL microfilm 2,372,964.

(James)

“United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX36-Y5W : 9 November 2014), James Ferrell in household of Thomas Ferrell, Jackson, Ashland, Ohio, United States; citing family 24, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

“United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCPM-WRJ : 30 December 2015), James Farrell in entry for Thomas Farrell, 1860.

“United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6LB-42M : 17 October 2014), James Ferrell in household of Margeret Ferrell, Ohio, United States; citing p. 19, family 144, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,772.

“Ohio Death Index, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2007,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VKRC-VFG : 8 December 2014), James M Ferrell, 05 Apr 1928; from “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2010); citing vol. , certificate number , Ohio Historical Society, Columbus; Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus.

“Ohio Deaths, 1908-1953,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8G9-YLM : 8 December 2014), James M Ferrell, 05 Apr 1928; citing Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, reference fn 26914; FHL microfilm 1,991,297.

Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=68898620&ref=acom

(Sarah)

“United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX3M-Z2T : 9 November 2014), Sarah A Miner in household of John Miner, Rumley, Harrison, Ohio, United States; citing family 118, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=111441813&ref=acom

Thomas Wilson Ferrell and Viola May Fisher

My great grandparents: Arthur Ferrell

Thomas Wilson Ferrell was born December 16, 1881 in Warwick Township, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. to James M. Ferrell and Sarah Adaline Minor. It appears Thomas was named after his grandfather, Thomas Ferrell, and an uncle, Wilson Ferrell. He married Viola May Fisher July 28, 1909 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. He died February 14, 1968, at Aultman Hospital in Canton, Stark, Ohio, US. He is buried at Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US.

thomaswferrell

Thomas attended First Methodist Church. He had numerous jobs in his life including working for Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. as an inspector; Twin City Fish Market in Uhrichsville as a fisher and trapper; Robinson Clay Plant as a blacksmith and working on the railroads and coal mines. He was able to read and write.

At the time of his WWI draft record, he was a blacksmith for Scott Coal Co. in Midvale, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. He was recorded as medium height and build with brown eyes and black hair. No exceptions were listed. He was listed as a blacksmith as early as the 1900 census. He worked for the insurance company in 1910. In 1920 he was working in the fish market, but by 1930 he was back to being a blacksmith, this time for the railroad company.

thomaswferrell2

On his WWII draft record, he was living at Route #2 in Uhrichsville. Listed as his employer was Universal Pipe Company in Cleveland, Ohio but after that was listed Robinson and Son, Sewerpipe, Uhrichsville, Tusc, Ohio. It states he was 5’8″, 211 pounds, brown eyes, brown hair and bald with a ruddy complexion. He had a scar above his left knee. My mom recalls everyone always joked in regards to his complexion; he was always so dark skinned he could have been part Native American.

He attended Big Bend Grade School, and Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania. At the time of their marriage, he was a theological student. He collected arrowheads.

greatgrandmagrandpaferrell2

In 1910, he and Viola were living at 512 Dawson, Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US., a house they rented. By 1920 they were living in a house which was mortgaged. In 1930 they were living at 30 State Highway No. 8, Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. which they owned. The home was valued at 1500 and they did own a radio set. In 1940 the home value or monthly rent amount was at 500, and it also states Thomas only completed 8th grade.

greatgrandmagrandpaferrell

Viola May Fisher was born April 11,1884 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. to Henry William Fisher and Sarah Ann Johnston.

thomasandviolaferrell

Screen capture of their birth record index, which just happened to list Viola right after Thomas.

She died July 1, 1959 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. She attended First Methodist Church where she was a Sunday School Teacher. She was able to read and write. She was a homemaker and according to the 1940 US Cenus, completed 8th grade.

violaferrell

Note: this newspaper clipping is the only record I have found which spells her name as Viola Mae. All other official documents spell it as Viola May.

violamaefisher

Viola May with Paul and Arthur.

greatgrandmaferrell

Their children were:

paulcarlgrandpa

Paul, Carl and Arthur

  1. Paul Harry Ferrell was born July 16, 1910 in Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. He married Phyllis M. Guest born 1913 in Ohio. They had three children: Joanne Ferrell married Donald E Davis (1928, served in the Army); Shirley (1935 -December 29, 2007) married Robert L Sonnhalter in 1952 and then in 1954 she remarried John P Ridley (1925 -1976); and Gary Ferrell. Paul died November 6, 1996 in Canton, Stark, Ohio, US. He completed 2 years of college, and worked in hard ware stores.
    unclepaulUncle Paul – high school photo
  2. Arthur Eugene Ferrell
    ferrells2Viola, Arthur and his sisters.
  3. Helen Mildred Ferrell was born April 1, 1927. She married Don Rankin (born April 7, 1929.) She married Jae Shloser. She married ? Shaver.
  4. Beatrice Marie Ferrell was born Arpril 2, 1916 in Uhrichsville,Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. She died April 13, 2005 in Dover, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. She married Milt Franks (born December 30, 1909.)auntbeaAunt Bea – high school photo

     

  5. Carl William Ferrell was born February 23, 1914 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. Carl married Helen Barger b. November 28, ?. He died July 6, 1993 in San Francisco, California, US.
  6. Lulu Mae Ferrell was born August 3, 1918 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. She married Earl Wellington Pocock (born May 28, 1917, died January 1985 Phoenix, Arizona). They had no children. She died May 17, 2007 in Phoenix, Arizona.auntlula

    Aunt Lula – high school photo

  7. Ruth Irene Ferrell was born September 15, 1920 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. She married Elmer Miller (born April 8, 1917, died 1942). She married Raymond Poland (born January 8, 1917). Her obituary:
    “Ruth I. Miller-Poland, age 87, of Canton, died Thursday evening, Jan. 31, 2008 at Aultman Hospital. She was born on Sept. 15, 1920 in Uhrichsville, OH to the late Thomas and Mae Ferrell. She attended the former Big Ben Grade School and graduated in 1938 from Uhrichsville High School. She had resided in the Canton area most of her life. She was an active member of Bethany United Methodist Church and the choir and Missionary Society. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Elmer Miller in 1950, her second husband, George Poland in 1991; a son, Ronald Poland who was killed in action in Vietnam; brothers, Carl, Paul and Arthur Ferrell and sisters, Bea Frank, Vera Schwab and Lulu Mae Pocock.. Mrs. Poland is survived be her sons, George(Carolyn) Poland of Massillon, Thomas (Sharon) Miller of Las Vegas, NV, Robert (Nancy) Poland of Canton, James (Linda) Miller of Poquson, VA, William (Catherine) Miller of Canton, Kenneth Poland of Carrollton, OH; 18 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren and her sister, Helen Shaver of Phoenix, AZ. Funeral services will be conducted at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in the Reed Funeral Home Canton Chapel with Rev. Melvin Browning officiating. Burial will be in Union Cemetery, Uhrichsville, OH. Calling hours Tuesday from 5 – 8 p.m. and Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to the time of service. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate contributions to Bethany United Methodist Church Missionary Society, 3906 Easton St. NE, North Canton, OH 44720. Those wishing to share their condolences or a fond memory may sign the Reed On-line Guestbook at http://www.reedfuneralhome.com

    The inscription on Ronald Poland’s tombstone reads “OHIO SGT Co B 26 Engineer Bn Vietnam BSM ARCOM-PH”

    • William and Catherine had three children: Joel, Jennifer, and Tim.
  8. Vera Gertrude Ferrell was born March 24, 1924 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. On January 25, 1947 she married James Edward Schwab (March 21, 1924 Tuscarawas, Ohio, US – May 8, 1975 Tuscarawas. The son of Herman Rufus Schwab (1896–1932) and Minnie Amanda Ruppenthal (1898 -1973)) He was an Army Veteran, having served in WWII. They had 3 children: 1 living and Janice Marie Schwab born 1953, died 2010 and James Richard Schwab born 1948 and died 1963. Janice married John Adams Wolfe 1950 – 2015. Vera died on April 10, 1994 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US.

auntvera

Aunt Vera – school photo

ferrells

The Ferrells, minus Carl.

Sources:

“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8JS-NC9 : 8 December 2014), Thomas W. Ferrell and Viola May Fisher, 28 Jul 1909; citing Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, reference cn 28405; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,369.

“United States Census, 1910,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MLFG-XY8 : 29 October 2015), Thomas Ferrell, Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 135, sheet 11B, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,375,249.

“United States Census, 1920,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MDR2-Y9T : 14 December 2015), Thomas W Ferrell, Mill, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 8B, NARA microfilm publication T625 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,821,444.

Directory Title: Walsh’s Uhrichsville, Ohio Directory; Year Range: 1927; Page #: 78; Publisher: R. L. Polk and Company; Publication Year: 1926 – 1927

“United States Census, 1930”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X4ZK-MJJ : 8 December 2015), Thomas W Ferrell, 1930.

(Thomas)

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6D3-YFH : 24 May 2016), Thomas Wilson Ferrell, 16 Dec 1881; citing Birth, Warwick Twp., Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,357.

“United States Census, 1900,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMX6-1KL : 22 January 2015), Thomas W Ferrell in household of James M Ferrell, Mill Township (excl. Dennison & Uhrichville), Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 8B, family 169, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,327.

“United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K6N8-XH9 : 12 December 2014), Thos Wilson Ferrell, 1917-1918; citing Tuscarawas County no 2, Ohio, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,851,246.

“United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X5CZ-7T5 : 8 April 2016), Thomas Wilson Ferrell, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

“Ohio Death Index, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2007,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VKY4-753 : 8 December 2014), Thomas W Ferrell, 14 Feb 1968; from “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2010); citing vol. 19180, certificate number 016588, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus; Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus.

Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

(Viola)

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X6D3-NVS : 24 May 2016), Viola Fisher, 11 Apr 1884; citing Birth, Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,357.

“Ohio, County Births, 1841-2003,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X633-WRH : 24 May 2016), Viola Fisher, 11 Apr 1884; citing Birth, Uhrichville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, United States, county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 890,359.

“Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XX36-TBD : 8 December 2014), Viola Fisher, 11 Apr 1884; citing Uhrichville,Tuscarawas, Ohio, reference ; FHL microfilm 890,359.

“Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2011. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.

Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.

Ancestry.com and Ohio Department of Health. Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data:

  • Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. Death Certificates and Index, December 20, 1908-December 31, 1953. State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.
  • Ohio Department of Health. Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002. Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA.

Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015. Original data: Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.

Arthur Eugene Ferrell and Kathryn Viola Slusser

My grandparents.

This will be the genealogy Web site for my maternal grandparents Arthur Eugene Ferrell and Kathryn Viola Slusser.

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Arthur Eugene Ferrell was born January 21, 1912 in Uhrichsville, Tuscarawas, Ohio, US. His birth record incorrectly names him as Author Eugene Ferrell. He was the son of Thomas Wilson Ferrell and Viola May Fisher. On May 25, 1938, he married Kathryn Viola Slusser.  He died November 13, 1996 and is buried at Sunset Hills Burial Park, Canton, Stark, Ohio, US.

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Arthur attended Uhrichsville High School and completed 12th grade. In 1928 he was in the science club for Chemistry, which required he obtain a grade of “E” every month. He was on the honor roll his sophomore and junior years. I was always told he had a photographic memory, and my family often reflected on his intelligence.

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In 1940, Arthur and Kathryn were living with his brother Paul’s family in Canton, Stark, Ohio, US. In 1952, he was working at Amstutz Hatchery. They last lived together at 7483 State St, Louisville, OH, 44641-9755, until his death.

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Catherine Viola Slusser was born November 2, 1920 in Stark, Ohio, US. however, her birth record names her simply as “Slusser.” At the age of 18, she changed the spelling of her name to Kathryn. Her parents were George Franklin Slusser and Lillian Lorena Zumkehr; her mother was the daughter of Swiss immigrants. She died December 5 of 2012 and is buried at Sunset Hills Burial Park, Canton, Stark, Ohio, US.

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In 1938, she was working as a dishwasher and living in Canton, Stark, Ohio, US. According to the 1940 US Census, she only completed her second year of high school.

Like myself, grandpa suffered from chronic daily headache for at least part of his life. I will remember him for his flannel shirts, and sitting in his chair under a blanket and watching day time soaps and golf or tennis on the TV together. He always grew roses, and I will always remember him wearing his roses in his lapel for church. I remember helping him and grandma in their small garden, and I will always remember how much he hated those tomatoes worms. Nor can I forget his dislike of pizza, simply because he hated the smell of it. I was told grandpa was a twin, but his twin did not survive birth. Grandpa collected decorative plates.

Grandma and grandpa knew each other from church, where they both were actively involved and each played instruments. On their first date, they went frog catching; they apparently enjoyed eating frog legs at least in their younger years. I remember grandma making little smokies, and her special little hamburgers and of course ice cream sundaes for breakfast. Grandma always grew and collected blackberries, and I remember helping her gather them. There was nothing as good as her freshly canned pears. She was a quiet woman, who never really knew what to say to others but enjoyed being around family. Most of all, I shall remember all she taught me about God and how to be a decent human being.

They had four children together, all living:

  1. David Eugene Ferrell (1939) married Sandy Zeppernesh. Their children: Cheryl L. Ferrell and DeeAnne Ferrell. Divorced 1963. Remarried Carol Hope Caldwell (1943). Their children: Shelley R. Ferrell, Gerald Alden Ferrell (born January 15, 1968, died January 17, 1968), John D. Ferrell, Laura D. Ferrell.
  2. Darlene Louise Ferrell (1942) married Gary Seymour (1941). Two daughters: April L. Seymour and Lynette K. Seymour.
  3. Cynthia Ann Ferrell (1945) married James Evers (1943). One daughter, Melissa A. Evers.
  4. Gail Lou Ferrell (1955) married James William Snyder II (1954). (Divorced)  Two daughters, myself – Melanie S. Snyder – and Meredith M. Snyder.

Sources:

“United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KWP7-QDV : 17 May 2014), Arthur Ferrell in household of Paul Ferrell, Ward 4, Canton City, Canton Township, Stark, Ohio, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 90-40, sheet 2A, family 19, NARA digital publication T627 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012), roll 3184.

Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

Ancestry.com. U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 2 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings.

 

(Grandpa)

Ancestry.com. Ohio, Birth Index, 1908-1964 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Ohio Birth Records. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio Vital Records Office.

Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data: Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).

Ancestry.com. U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Ancestry.com and Ohio Department of Health. Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data:

  • Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. Death Certificates and Index, December 20, 1908-December 31, 1953. State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.
  • Ohio Department of Health. Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002. Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA.

Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2011. Original data: Social Security Administration. Social Security Death Index, Master File. Social Security Administration.

 

Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&amp;GRid=84585372&amp;ref=acom

 

(Grandma)

Ancestry.com. Ohio, Birth Index, 1908-1964 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Ohio Birth Records. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio Vital Records Office.

Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

Ancestry.com. U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, Volume 1 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings.

Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&amp;GRid=84585373&amp;ref=acom.